Top 100 Tu B’Shevat Blessings With Images {*FRESH*}

Tu B’Shevat Blessings: Here we will provide you with Quotes, SMS, Wishes, Greetings with some best and great collection of Tu B’Shevat Blessings which you can easily share with your friends and family.

Tu B’Shevat Blessings

Top 20 Tu B’Shevat Blessings With Images {*FRESH*}

1. Torah is a tree of life to those who hold fast to it. and they that support it is happy.

2. Tu B’Shevat Healthy body, Healthy soal

3. May the seeds of our heart blossom in our prayers, watered with our tears and nurtured with our faith, take root in heaven and bear fruit on earth.

4. We can never be ”TU” grateful for the beauty of nature!

5. Advice from the tree; Stand tall and proud remember your roots, drink plenty of water, be go tent with your, natural beauty, enjoy the view

6. Six days a week we seek to dominate the world on the seventh day we try to dominate the self.

7. Love yourself then forget it. then, love the world.

8. Be happy for this moment this moment is your life

9. Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.

10. When a jew prays he’s asking god a nevermind question

11. ‘And they came to Elim, where were 12 springs of water and 70 palm trees; and they encamped here by the waters.’

12. ‘And God said: “Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree that has seed-yielding fruit — to you it shall be for food.”‘

13. ‘Happy is the man … who delights in the law of the Lord, and on his law he meditates day and night. He is like a tree planted by streams of water, that yields its fruit in its season, and its leaf does not wither.’

14. ‘Rabbi Shimon said, “The shade spread over us by these trees is so pleasant! We must crown this place with words of Torah.”‘

15. ‘Shimon bar Yochai taught that “if you are holding a sapling in your hand, and someone says that the Messiah has drawn near, first plant the sapling, and then go and greet the Messiah.”‘

16. And on the banks, on both sides of the river, there will grow all kinds of trees for food. Their leaves will not wither nor their fruit fail, but they will bear fresh fruit every month, because the water for them flows from the sanctuary. Their fruit will be for food, and their leaves for healing.’

17. ‘He will be like a tree planted near water…’

18. ‘For as the days of a tree shall be the days of my people.’

19. ‘Rabbi Simon said, “There is no plant without an angel in Heaven tending it and telling it, ‘Grow!’”

20. Wish you very very grateful and loving Tu B Shevat

21. And God said: “Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree that has seed-yielding fruit — to you it shall be for food.” (Genesis 1:29)

22. In the hour when the Holy one, blessed be He, created the first person, He showed him the trees in the Garden of Eden, and said to him: “See My works, how fine they are; Now all that I have created, I created for your benefit. Think upon this and do not corrupt and destroy My world, For if you destroy it, there is no one to restore it after you.” (Ecclesiastes Rabbah 7:28)

23. When you shall besiege a city a long time, in making war against it to take it, you shall not destroy (lo tashchit) the trees thereof by wielding an ax against them; for you may eat of them, but you must not cut the down; for is the tree of the field a man, that it should be besieged by you? Only the trees of which you know that they are not trees for food, them you may destroy and cut down, that you may build bulwarks against the city that makes war with you, until it fall. (Deuteronomy 20:19, 20)

24. And they came to Elim, where were 12 springs of water and 70 palm trees; and they encamped here by the waters. (Deuteronomy 15:27) Rabeynu Bachya saw a much deeper message. He stated that the 12 springs represented the 12 tribes and the 70 palm trees represented the 70 then nations of the world. He stated that just as the 12 springs nourished the 70 palm trees, the 12 tribes (the Jewish people) should serve to “nourish” the world by serving as a good example.

25. Happy is the man … who delights in the law of the Lord, and on his law he meditates day and night. He is like a tree planted by streams of water, that yields its fruit in its season, and its leaf does not wither. (Psalms 1: 1-3)

26. And on the banks, on both sides of the river, there will grow all kinds of trees for food. Their leaves will not wither nor their fruit fail, but they will bear fresh fruit every month, because the water for them flows from the sanctuary. Their fruit will be for food, and their leaves for healing. (Ezekiel 47:12)

27. Rabbi Shimon said, “The shade spread over us by these trees is so pleasant! We must crown this place with words of Torah.” (Zohar, 2:127a)

28. While the sage Choni was walking along a road, he saw a man planting a carob tree. Choni asked him: “How long will it take for this tree to bear fruit?” “Seventy years,” replied the man. Choni then asked: “Are you so healthy a man that you expect to live that length of time and eat its fruit?” The man answered: “I found a fruitful world because my ancestors planted it for me. Likewise, I am planting for my children.”

29. Shimon bar Yochai taught that “if you are holding a sapling in your hand, and someone says that the Messiah has drawn near, first plant the sapling, and then go and greet the Messiah.” (Avot d’Rebbe Natan 31b)

30. For as the days of a tree shall be the days of my people. (Isaiah 65:22)

31. He will be like a tree planted near water… (Jeremiah 17:8)

32. R’ Abba taught: There is no greater revealing of redemption than that which the verse states: “And you, mountains of Israel, you shall give forth your branches and you shall bear your fruit for my people Israel, for they shall soon come.” (Ezekiel 36:8; Talmud Sanhedrin 98a)

33. It is forbidden to cut down fruit-bearing trees outside a besieged city, nor may a water channel be deflected from them so that they wither. Whoever cuts down a fruit-bearing tree is flogged. This penalty is imposed not only for cutting it down during a siege; whenever a fruit-yielding tree is cut down with destructive intent, flogging is incurred. It may be cut down, however, if it causes damage to other trees or to a field belonging to another man or if its value for other purposes is greater. The Law forbids only wanton destruction… Not only one who cuts down trees, but also one who smashes household goods, tears clothes, demolishes a building, stops up a spring, or destroys articles of food with destructive intent transgresses the command “you must not destroy.” Such a person is not flogged, but is administered a disciplinary beating imposed by the Rabbis. (Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Laws of Kings and Wars 6:8,10)

34. Rabbi Simon said, “There is no plant without an angel in Heaven tending it and telling it, ‘Grow!’” (Genesis Rabba 10:7).

35. And I will restore my people Israel and they shall build the waste cities and inhabit them, and they shall plant vineyards and drink the wine, they shall also make gardens and eat the fruit. (Amos 9:14)

36. Israel is like the date palm, of which none is wasted; its dates are for eating, its lulavim are for blessing; its fronds are for thatching; its fibers are for ropes; its webbing for sieves; its thick trunks for building – so it is with Israel, which contains no waste. (Genesis Rabbah 41)

37. And G-d said, “Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit trees yielding fruit after its kind, whose seed is on the earth,” and it was so. And the earth blossomed with grass, herbs and trees, and G-d saw that it was good. (Genesis 1:9-13)

38. Everyone will sit under their vine and fig tree and none shall make them afraid; for the Lord of Hosts has spoken. (Micah 4:4)

39. And God said: “Let the earth put forth grass, herb-yielding seeds, and fruit trees bearing fruit of its kind.” “Fruit tree” means the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, which put forth blossoms and fruit. “Bearing fruit” is the tzaddik, the basis of the world. ‘Of its kind’ means all the human beings who have in them the spirit of holiness, which is the blossom of that tree. This is the covenant of holiness, the covenant of peace — and the faithful enter into that kind and do not depart from it. The Tzaddik generates, and the tree conceives and brings forth fruit of its kind. (Zohar – Bereishit 33a)

40. “My teacher [the holy Arizal] used to say that one must intend while eating the fruits [at the Tu B’Shvat Seder] to repair the sin of Adam who erred by eating fruit from the tree.” (Rabbi Chaim Vital)

41. An introductory essay by Arthur Waskow that traces Tu B’Shvat’s growth throughout history from its original status as a day that separated trees in terms of when tithings were due, through the establishment of the Tu B’Shvat seder by the kabbalists of Sefat in the sixteenth century, through the associations with tree-planting of nineteenth century Zionists, to recent adaptations by modern environmentalists;

42. Quotations related to trees and other Tu B’Shvat-related concepts from the Torah and other Jewish sources;

43. Material related to rabbinic dicussions related to Tu B’Shvat, including a recently discovered medieval prayer, “Shmoneh Esrei for the New Year for Trees,” and insightful essays on bal tashchit, the mandate to not waste or unnecessarily destroy anything of value, based on a Torah verse not to destroy fruit-bearing trees in wartime, by Rabbi Norman Lamm, President of Yeshiva University, and by Eilon Schwartz, Director of the Heschel Center for Environmental Learning and Leadership in Israel.

44. Seven items relating kabbalah and hasidism to Tu B’Shvat, including a translation of “Peri Eitz Hadar,” a kabbalistic Tu B’Shvat seder.

45. Five items relating Tu B’Shvat to Zionism and the land of Israel, including an extensive analysis of how the Jewish National Fund (Keren Kayemet le-Yisrael) used tree plantings on Tu B’Shvat to educate young Israelis on love of the land of Israel and nature.

46. Thirteen wide-ranging items on connections between Tu B’Shvat themes and “eco-Judaism’ and current environmental problems, including essays relating the holiday to recent efforts to save the Redwood forests and an analysis of current environmental threats by Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological seminaryt.

47. Much wonderful material to help celebrate Tu B’Shvat today, including blessings for the seder, suggestions for cooking up a Tu B’Shvat seder, suggestions to involve children in the Tu B’Shvat seder and other holiday-related activities, suggestions about planting and taking care of trees, suggestions about new Tu B’Shvat traditions, recipes, and songs.

48. An article co-authored by Jonathan Wolf and this author on “Judaism, Vegetarianism, and Tu B’Shvat,” which discusses aspects of “the most vegetarian holiday”.

49. Sources for Learning and Doing (“Seeds”), including a listing of “Environmental Organizations, Publications, and Videos,” a discussion of several Tu B’Shvat seder Haggadot, and sources for information about tree planting.

50. How good and pleasant it is for
sisters to dwell together in unity.

51. In the Hebrew numerical system, the letters “tet” and “vav”, (which can be pronounced together as “tu”) represent the numbers, nine and six, respectively, for a total of 15. Therefore “Tu b’Shevat” is the 15th day of the month of Shevat.

52. Tu b’Shevat was the date set for the tithing of fruit, and the date defining the end of the fruit crop of the previous year.

53. Tu b’Shevat is one of four new years in the Jewish calendar. The others are: the first of Nissan for counting the reigns of kings and the three festivals; the first of Elul for the tithing of animals, and the first of Tishrei for the judgment of mankind, the tithing of grain, and the counting of shmitah.

54. In Israel, winter is usually a time of heavy rains and rushing, surging creeks and rivulets. At about the middle of the month of Shevat, the severe rainstorms cease, and soon thereafter, signs of spring begin to appear. Although two more months of winter remain, buds begin to swell on the trees, the enduring symbol of God’s promise of renewed life.

55. The ancient New Year of the Trees, or Rosh Hashanah L’ilanot, was thought to be sacred to the women of Israel. It celebrated the New Year of God’s female aspect, the Shechinah.

56. According to some traditions, Noah’s Ark landed in the month of Shevat, and the dove (a long-established Near Eastern symbol of God’s feminine qualities), returned to the Ark with an olive branch in her beak. She heralds new life and the promise of a world that will once again bloom and provide nurture, as God promises never again to destroy all living creatures (Genesis 8:21)

57. In Israel, since the beginning of agricultural settlements in the late 19th century, the New Year of the Trees has acquired great significance, symbolizing the revival and redemption of the land. Tu b’Shevat is celebrated with songs, and trees are planted to honor or memorialize loved ones.

58. Tu b’Shevat has also become a day of commitment to protecting the environment. Judaism teaches that the earth is the Creator’s, and that we are to be partners and co-workers with God in preserving our planet and its resources.

59. An ancient midrash has become all too relevant today:

60. In the hour when the Holy One created the first person, God showed His creation the trees in the Garden of Eden, and said:

61. “See My works, how fine they are; now all that I have created, I created for your benefit. Think upon this and do not corrupt and destroy My world. For if you destroy it, there is no one to restore it after you.” (Ecclesiastes Rabbah 7:28)

62. Another image connected to the story of the Garden of Eden is the Tree of Life. The siddur compares the Torah to a tree, Etz Chayim. Just as we take sustenance from a tree, so our way of life sustains us in strength and beauty.

63. The 16th-century mystics of Safed understood the emanations of God in the form of an inverted Tree, whose roots (above) are invisible and inexplicable to us and whose trunk and branches reach (down) toward us. Through this Tree there courses the ultimate flow of universal life. It originates in the unimaginable Ein Sof or Infinite One, and becomes progressively more in touch with our world, in which creation is continually taking place.

64. The New Year of the Trees is regarded as a holy time. By saying blessings and partaking of many kinds of fruits, we have the opportunity to thank God for the wonder of renewed life, and to reawaken our own spiritual connections. In addition, we honor the land of Israel by enjoying her fruits, especially those of the seven species: wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates, olives and dates.

65. We will drink four cups of wine of different colors during the course of our Seder. The colors symbolically take us through the seasons and the colors of the year; from winter whites to a touch of spring red, from rosy summer to the full redness of autumn.

66. In order to serve God, one needs access to the enjoyment of the beauties of nature – meadows full of flowers, majestic mountains, flowing rivers. For all these are essential to the spiritual development of even the holiest of people. (Rabbi Abraham ben Maimonides, cited by Rabbi David E. Stein in A Garden of Choice Fruits, Shomrei Adamah, 1991).

67. Once, when Rav Abraham Kook was walking in the fields, lost deep in thought, the young student with him inadvertently plucked a leaf off a branch. Rav Kook was visibly shaken by this act, and turning to his companion he said gently, “Believe me when I tell you I never simply pluck a leaf or a blade of grass or any living thing, unless I have to.” He explained further, “Every part of the vegetable world is singing a song and breathing forth a secret of the divine mystery of the Creation.” For the first time the young student understood what it means to show compassion to all creatures. (Wisdom of the Mystics)

68. No part of the date palm is wasted:
The fruit is eaten,
the embryonic branches (lulav) are used for the Four Species of Sukkot,
the mature fronds can cover a sukka,
the fibers between the branches can make strong ropes,
the leaves can be woven into mats and baskets,
the trunks can be used for rafters.
Similarly, no one is worthless in Israel:
some are scholars,
some do good deeds,
and some work for social justice.
(Midrash Numbers Rabba 3.1)

69. Every part of the vegetable world is singing a song and bringing forth a secret of the divine mystery of creation (Rav Kook)

70. The tree of life has five hundred thousand kinds of fruit, each differing in taste. The appearance of one fruit is not like the appearance of the other, and the fragrance of one fruit is not like the fragrance of the other. Clouds of glory hover above the tree, and from the four directions winds blow on it, so that its fragrance is wafted from world’s end to world’s end.” (Yalkut Bereishit 2)

71. The Jerusalem Talmud teaches that “On Tu B’Shevat most of the winter rain has already passed, and the roots of the trees begin to suckle from the new rains of the current winter, and no longer suckle from last year’s rains.”

72. How can a person of flesh and blood follow God? … God, from the very beginning of creation, was occupied before all else with planting, as it is written, “And first of all [mi-kedem, usually translated as “in the East”], the Eternal God planted a Garden in Eden [Genesis 2:8] Therefore … occupy yourselves first and foremost with planting (Leviticus Rabbah 25:3).

73. [The Torah compares humans to trees] because, like humans, trees have the power to grow. And as humans have children, so trees bear fruit. And when a human is hurt, cries of pain are heard throughout the world, so when a tree is chopped down, its cries are heard throughout the world. (Rashi)

74. When a tree that bears fruit is cut down, its moan goes from one end of the world to the other, yet no sound is heard (Pirket de-R. Eliezar 34)

75. Whoever has more wisdom than deeds is like a tree with many branches but few roots, and the wind shall tear him from the ground… Whoever has more deeds than wisdom is like a tree with more roots than branches, and no hurricane will uproot him from the spot. (Pirke Avot 3:17)

76. I shall bring you an example of what this resembles. It is like a man, who wanders in the desert, weak with hunger, exhaustion and thirst, and finds a tree with sweet fruits and shady leaves, beneath which is a source of water. He eats the fruit, drinks the water and rests in the shade. When it comes time to leave, he thinks: “O, tree, how shall I thank you? If I say, “May your fruit be sweet” – they are already sweet; shall I say, “May your shade be beautiful?” – it is so; or, “May your roots find moisture?” – they already have it. So I shall say, “May everything which comes from you resemble you.” (Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Ta’anit, p.5)

77. It was the custom when a boy was born to plant a cedar tree and when a girl was born to plant a pine tree, and when they married, the tree was cut down and a canopy made of the branches. (Gittin 57a)

78. Rabbi Yaakov Said: “When A Person Walks On A Journey Reviewing [A Passage Of The Torah], And Interrupts His Study To Remark: ‘How Beautiful Is This Tree! How Beautiful Is This Plowed Field!’ [The Torah] Considers It As If He Were Guilty Of A Mortal Sin.” (Pirke Avot 3:9)

79. A tree of life to those who hold fast to it,
and all who cling to it find happiness. Its ways are ways of pleasantness, and all its paths are peace. (Proverbs 3:17-18)

80. And I will turn the captivity of my people of Israel, and they shall build the waste cities and inhabit them; and they shall plant vineyards and drink the wine thereof; they shall also make gardens and eat the fruit of them. (Amos 9:14)

81. The trees will yield their fruit and the ground will yield its crops; the people will be secure in their land. They will know that I am the LORD, when I break the bars of their yoke and rescue them from the hands of those who enslaved them. (Ezekiel 34:27-28)

82. And He shall judge between many peoples, and shall decide concerning mighty nations afar off; and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.
But they shall sit every man under his vine and under his fig tree; and none shall make them afraid; for the mouth of the LORD of hosts hath spoken.
For let all the peoples walk each one in the name of its god, but we will walk in the name of the LORD our God forever and ever. (Micah 4:3-5)

83. I will plant in the wilderness the cedar, the acacia-tree, and the myrtle, and the oil-tree; I will set in the desert the cypress, the plane-tree, and the larch together; That they may see, and know, and consider, and understand together, that the hand of the LORD hath done this, and the Holy One of Israel hath created it.Our first cup of wine is white, symbolizing winter. As we drink it, we recall that nature has been dormant for many months, awaiting the warmth of spring and its annual renewal of life.

84. We eat different fruits to honor the Four Worlds in which we live simultaneously;

85. The first is Assiyah, or Action, the physical world around us.
The second is Yetzirah, or Formation, the world of feelings and emotions.
The third is B’riyah, or Creation, the world of knowing, and the mind.
The fourth is Atzilut, or Emanation, the world of spirituality.

86. For Assiyah (earth, action), we eat nuts and fruits with a tough skin to remind us of the protection the earth gives. Through this act we acknowledge that we need protection in life, both physical and emotional.

87. Fruits in this group, which are inedible on the outside, but edible on the inside include: pomegranate, nuts, citrus fruits, and coconuts.

88. Thought: Some people are hard to know, but once their outer layer is peeled away, you are rewarded.

89. B’rukha at Shechinah
Boreit p’ri ha’etz.

90. Blessed are You, Divine Presence,
Who creates the fruit of the tree.

91. In Hebrew, the almond tree is called sha-ked, meaning “to watch, wake”, because it blooms in winter and is thus the first fruit tree to bloom in the new agricultural year.

92. The shape of the menorah, which is a universally recognized symbol for Judaism, is based on the silhouette of the almond tree.

93. The almond tree is growing,
A golden sun is glowing;
The birds sing out in joyous glee
From every roof and every tree.

94. Tu B’Shevat is here – the Jewish Arbor Day
Hail the trees’ New Year – Happy Holiday!

95. Mother earth, well worn, sun washed
Both slave and mistress am I beloved
Out of me, the humble and dejected
You grow, you push your roots through me
And like the blazing stars, like the flame of the sun
In long blind silences I run
Through your roots, in your branches
And half awake and half in a dream I see the sky through you.

96. By Anna Margolin, translated by Adrienne Cooper from Sarah’s Daughter’s Sing

97. We now raise our cups and prepare to recite kiddush over our second cup of wine.

98. Our second cup of wine is white but tinged with red. The mixture of colors symbolizes the beginning of spring and the reawakening of the earth. In Israel, pink and white flowers dot the hills and mountains at this season. As we drink the wine, let us think of one special hope or wish we have for the coming spring.

99. For Yetzirah (heart, formation), we eat fruits with a tough inner core. Through this act we acknowledge the need to fortify our hearts. With a strong heart and a pure vision, our lives grow richer and deeper.

100. Fruits of this group, which are edible on the outside with a hard inner pit include: dates, olives, cherries, peaches and avocados.